HomeFraud Awareness

Fraud Awareness


Fraud Alerts

 

News Release 07/06/14-Construction Scam Awareness

The Evansville Police Department wants to remind tri-state homeowners and businesses that with the warming spring and summer weather comes the possibility of various forms of construction scams.  This is the prime time of year for home improvement fraud as well as driveway and parking lot sealing and paving scams sometimes involving subjects from out of state who may offer what seems like a price well below what local contractors quote.  We encourage area residents and businesses to be vigilant regarding subjects actively soliciting painting, paving, sealing, or other property improvement services. You should hire only licensed contractors who can provide proof of insurance and bonding.   Evansville residents and businesses who believe they have been a victim of such a scheme should contact the Evansville Police Department Financial Crimes Unit at (812)436-7991.  Area residents and businesses outside of the City of Evansville who believe they have been victimized should contact their agency of jurisdiction. 

 

Caller ID Spoofing

 

Recently, a resident received a phone call from a person posing as a debt collector.  The caller claimed the resident owed several hundred dollars and would be arrested if they did not pay.  The Caller ID showed the call was from the Evansville Police Department and listed an actual EPD phone number.  The resident was suspicious and contacted EPD. 

The Evansville Police Department is not involved in the collection of debts. 

Technology exists that enables callers to manipulate the name and phone number displayed on the recepient's Caller ID display.  There are several websites that specialize in selling these types of services. 

If you receive a suspicious call, it is recommended that you do not provide any sensitive personal information to the caller.  You can then contact the business or agency directly through a published phone number to determine if the call is legitimate. 

 

Bail Bond Scam

 

A local resident received a call from a person claiming to be a lawyer for the resident's friend.  The caller claimed the friend had been arrested and requested the resident provide bail money. The resident purchased prepaid credit cards and then provided the card numbers to the caller to post the bail.  Once the resident realized this was a scam, the money had already been transfered from the cards. 

In this type of scam, the suspect preys on the victim's desire to help a friend or relative in need.  These calls are often received in the middle of the night or on weekends.  When questioned, the caller often claims that the friend or relative is in danger and the payment is needed immediately.

  It is suggested that a person receiving this type of call attempt to directly contact the friend or detaining law enforcement agency/ correctional facility to confirm the legitimacy of the call.

 

Counterfeit US Currency

Suspects passing counterfeit currency continues to be a problem for local residents and businesses.  Currently, the most commonly encountered counterfeit US currency are twenty and one hundred dollar bills.  For tips on  identifying counterfeit currency, got to www.secretservice.gov and explore the "Know Your Money" page. 

 

Work at Home Scams

 

A common scam involves advertisements that claim to offer significant income while working from home.  These advertisements can be found online and in the print media.  There are many variations of this scam.  Some recently encountered ones involve  promotional advertising and reshipping items to foreign or domestic locations.   The con artists usually require the applicant to provide personal identifying information and/or bank acount information.  The con artist often sends the victim a check in excess of the agreed amount, asks the victim to deposit it in their bank account, and then send the overage back to the sender or a third party via check, money order, or electronic means.  By the time the victim discovers that the payment they received is fraudulent, the con artist has the victim's money. The con artist can also then use the personal information provided by the victim to commit identity theft.   Residents should thoroughly investigate any work at home offers before providing personal  information.